What is a Vector Index?

As of 2016, Chester County is using the Vector Index method of using mosquito data to predict the West Nile Virus threat to humans. Here is a summary from “2013 West Nile Virus in the United States: Guidelines for Surveillance, Prevention, and Control” at the CDC site, p. 18 (boldface added):

The Vector Index (VI) is an estimate of the abundance of infected mosquitoes in an area and incorporates information describing the vector species that are present in the area, relative abundance of those species, and the WNV infection rate in each species into a single index (Gujaral et al. 2007, Bolling et al. 2009, Jones et al. 2011). The VI is calculated by multiplying the average number of mosquitoes collected per trap night by the proportion infected with WNV, and is expressed as the average number of infected mosquitoes collected per trap night in the area during the sampling period. In areas where more than one WNV vector mosquito species is present, a VI is calculated for each of the important vector species and the individual VIs are summed to represent a combined estimate of the infected vector abundance. By summing the VI for the key vector species, the combined VI accommodates the fact that WNV transmission may involve one or more vectors in an area. Increases in VI reflect increases in risk of human disease (Bolling et al. 2009, Jones et al. 2011, Kwan et al. 2012, Colborn et al. 2013 in press) and have demonstrated significantly better predictive ability than estimates of vector abundance or infection rate alone, clearly demonstrating the value of combining information for vector abundance and WNV infection rates to generate a more meaningful risk index (Bolling et al. 2009). As with other surveillance indicators, the accuracy of the Vector Index is dependent upon the number of trap nights used to estimate abundance and the number of specimens tested for virus to estimate infection rate. Instructions for calculating the Vector Index in a system with multiple vector species present are in Appendix 2.

For the actual VI formula and a detailed example, see pp. 64-66 of the above Guidelines.

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