“The Future of Energy,” last in the 2018 Environmental film Series

Environmentalists and those just learning about the challenges we are facing with a warming planet gathered at West Chester University on Friday, December 7, to view the film “The Future of Energy.”

The program, moderated by Paula Kline of Ready for 100, also featured the presentation of an award for volunteer of the year on behalf of Don’t Spray Me! by Sierra Club of SE PA leader Wylie. Rachel Davis, who won this honor as a result of her leadership on environmental issues in the community, headed the program Adopt a Drain with the Sierra Club Youth Corps, monitoring storm drains throughout West Chester Borough. Rachel is a member of Mayor Herrin’s committee to phase out the use of single-use plastic in the borough. She was also a block captain and board member for Don’t Spray Me! and serves the Borough on the Sustainability Advisory Committee. Congratulations, Rachel.

This film, the final this year in a series of four, was sponsored by Don’t Spray Me!, Sierra Club, PennFuture, PennEnvironment and West Chester University’s Office of Sustainability. This second annual series was presented to the community in memory of Graham Hudgings, who died last year as a result of chemical poisoning. Graham wanted everyone to be aware of the dangers of pesticides, herbicides, fungicides and all of the everyday chemicals people now encounter in their daily lives.

For background info on the film, see here.

“Adopt a Drain” in West Chester

by Rachel Davis, geologist and environmental professional

“Adopt a Drain” is a free, community-driven service program for West Chester Borough started in May 2018 by the Chester County Sierra Club-sponsored Don’t Spray Me! Group and is supported by West Chester Borough Council. Our goal is to educate citizens of all ages, but concentrating mostly on the youth, on how to maintain their local waterways by first caring about the direct avenues to those waterways: the storm water drains. Most people pass drains by without a thought — because drains are flush with the ground and easily overlooked. However, with enough time and education, one can truly begin to understand how important these vital pathways are to our community’s health and well-being.

The program is based on the nationwide concept called “Adopt a Drain” as featured from Nashville to Burlington to St. Louis. Cities throughout the United States are making it viable and accessible to citizens to perform voluntary drain cleaning activities by incorporating debris collection and notation with computer-based mapping software. When the hands-on aspect joins with the technological, a comprehensive city- or town-wide view of the drain quality can be constructed.

The West Chester Borough “Adopt a Drain” program has thus far completed two two-hour events in which we worked as a team to find, observe, take notes on and then clean the surficial area around the storm drains in the borough in Ward 3. We are working to complete this same activity per ward per section until all 1000+ drains are completed within the Borough by the end of the summer 2018. At each drain, we note if there is organic debris (leaves, sticks, etc.), plastic debris/trash (bags, straws, cups, lids, etc.) and/or standing water in and/or around the drain. By combining the physical removal of waste from the drains and the observing of the standing water inside the drains, we hope to identify which drains need attention from the borough to be cleaned further, fixed, dredged, or larvicided.

By the end of summer 2018, “Adopt a Drain” plans to present our data to the West Chester Borough Council and Public Works Department with the help of a West Chester University Graduate Student concentrating in Geographical Information Systems. Additionally, we hope to address the problem of mosquito larvae in the standing water within the drains and share a detailed view of trash in the borough’s drains too. Given the success of the program thus far, we hope that our observations continue to educate citizens for years to come and that the program is embedded in West Chester’s sustainable culture.

The program is open and available to all ages and but is prepared if the participant is less than age 12 that there be a parent or guardian there to support the event. If you are interested in joining in our events, please email me. Meetings at 1 pm on Sundays are confirmed through an email blast. We hope to see you there!