Mosquito control treatment scheduled for Parkesburg Borough to prevent West Nile Virus

[Note: we have often wondered how a pesticide can “prevent” a virus when it can’t even “prevent” mosquitoes. Note on the active ingredient deltamethrin from Wikipedia: “Resistance has been characterised in several insects, including important vectors of malaria like the mosquito Anopheles gambiae as well as non-disease carrying pests like bed bugs.” That is one of the problems with any pesticide: insects can become resistant to anything! Because of acquired resistance, Permanone (previously used in Chesco) could not be used in Miami during the recent Zika scare. If you live in the spray area, see how you can help us here.]

from Chesco Health Department pdf

West Chester, PA – The Chester County Health Department will conduct a mosquito control treatment spray in portions of Parkesburg (see map below). The treatment is scheduled for Thursday, August 9th from 8:00 pm to 11:30 pm. The rain date for this event is Monday, August 13th from 8:00pm to 11:30pm.

The Chester County Health Department conducts mosquito control treatment in areas with high levels of mosquito activity and where multiple mosquito samples have tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV). After exhausting all other available mosquito control strategies, spraying is conducted to reduce residents’ risk of WNV infection. Anyone living in an area where mosquitoes are infected with WNV is at risk, but the risk of infection is highest for people who work outside or participate in outdoor activities. Less than 1% of people infected will develop serious illness. While serious illness can occur in people of any age, people over 60 years of age, people who have received organ transplants, and people with certain medical conditions such as cancer, diabetes, hypertension, and kidney disease are at the greatest risk for serious illness.

The Chester County Health Department uses a truck-mounted sprayer to apply .66 ounces of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved product (DeltaGard) per acre of land….

read more in the Chesco Health Department pdf

Advertisements

Case studies in what to avoid


Above-ground pools are often forgotten or abandoned and are perfect hosts for organic matter and, consequently, mosquito families. (In-ground pools usually have enough chemicals to deter mosquito breeding, but beware of water accumulating on pool covers!)


Puddle dug by cars at the edge of the road. If it stays wet for 7 days, it will be productive!


Clogged eave about 7 feet off the ground, easily accessible to mosquitoes (they will fly much higher too). The obstruction at the far end (the low end, over the downpipe unless there is a construcvtion error) needs to be cleared regularly.


Looking down this grill over a storm drain, you can see sky reflected back to you from water standing at the bottom. A beacon to egg-laying mosquitoes!

Trash can lid with larvae
Overturned trash lids can hold water. Lids should be tightly affixed to containers at all times in order to keep out water and other common pests like rats.

 

Flat roof syndrome. For some reason architects or builders can’t always figure out drainage, or else the roof sags over time. Yes, mosquitoes fly pretty high. If the roof retains water for a week after eggs are laid, the roof is a breeding site!

The risks outweigh the benefits

by George Squire CRNP, Active member of DSM

We have noted in recent months that the risks outweigh the benefits when it come to spraying for mosquitoes.

Chemical sensitivity in humans and animals can be deadly when sprays are used indiscriminately. The entire planet becomes the target for such spraying. Infinitely preferable is the use of preventative measures such as BT larvicide which has proved very effective in stopping mosquitoes before they hatch.

As in the field of Medicine, prevention is the key to effective control of this problem. Over the past decade, Medicine has moved toward an evidence-based approach, which has produced some sound research-based science. The data from the use of pesticide and herbicidal sprays has been sadly lacking regarding any potential benefit from their use. Unfortunately, we will always be able to count on the lobbying on behalf of the chemical companies to propagandize us about the benign nature of their products. Their desire for increased profit will continue to skew the public’s understanding of the true nature of these chemicals.

A friend from St Peter’s Village who is a beekeeper and maintains a garden there, has noticed a drastic decline in his bees and other beneficial insects. A steady drop off like this in bees and other beneficial creatures could lead to an agricultural disaster for consumers and farmers alike. Future untold problems could arise with shortages in fruits and vegetables, not to mention farm animals and pets that may eat the poisoned crops.

Let us appeal to our public servants assigned to these tasks. Let us ask them to put their constituents first and make our neighborhoods safer, and maintain the constitutional right to happiness. Let us remind them that there are alternatives to using poison in our water and on our land.

Mosquito control treatment scheduled for Spring City Borough to prevent West Nile Virus

release from Chesco Health Dept., 7/30/18

West Chester, PA – The Chester County Health Department will conduct a mosquito control treatment spray in portions of Spring City Borough (see maps below). The treatment is scheduled for Wednesday, August 1st from 8:00 pm to 11:30 pm. The rain date for this event is Monday, August 6th from 8:00 pm to 11:30 pm.

The Chester County Health Department conducts mosquito control treatment in areas with high levels of mosquito activity and where multiple mosquito samples have tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV). After exhausting all other available mosquito control strategies, spraying is conducted to reduce residents’ risk of WNV infection. Anyone living in an area where mosquitoes are infected with WNV is at risk, but the risk of infection is highest for people who work outside or participate in outdoor activities. Less than 1% of people infected will develop serious illness. While serious illness can occur in people of any age, people over 60 years of age, people who have received organ transplants, and people with certain medical conditions such as cancer, diabetes, hypertension, and kidney disease are at the greatest risk for serious illness.

The Chester County Health Department uses a truck-mounted sprayer to apply .66 ounces of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved product (DeltaGard) per acre of land…

text continues as usual; see here

Stop the attack on industrial safety rules that protect millions of Americans from chemical disasters

email from BlueGreen Alliance. We need to remember that all these chemicals floating around through our air, and pipelines are manufactured somewhere, including in Chester County, and the risks to the public and first responders must be minimized.

The EPA finalized a new Chemical Disaster Rule in January 2017, four years after an industrial explosion in West, Texas, killed 13 firefighters and two residents and leveled much of the town. The rule included new requirements for companies to prevent chemical releases, fires, and explosions, and required that companies work with first responders to improve emergency preparedness and coordination. Millions of Americans live close enough to an industrial facility to be affected by a chemical disaster.

The EPA put the new rule on hold last year, and now the agency is proposing to gut the rule, eliminating basic provisions that would protect workers and the communities around these facilities.

Tell the EPA to stop playing with fire. We need a strong Chemical Disaster Rule that will better protect millions of American workers and communities.

Roughly 177 million Americans live close enough to an industrial facility to be affected by a chemical accident, and that risk falls disproportionately on low-income and minority communities. One-in-three schoolchildren attend a school in the vulnerability zone for an industrial chemical accident, meaning they are potentially in the path of a lethal industrial chemical release. Workers are at greatest risk of injury or death, alongside first responders, who often have to put their lives on the line responding to the industrial fires, explosions, and chemical releases that continue to occur 150 times each year across the nation.

The EPA has shown that serious chemical accidents can be prevented if companies implement updated safety precautions. Submit your comment to the EPA today supporting a strong Chemical Disaster Rule.

The Chemical Disaster Rule will protect millions of residents and workers and must be implemented in its January 2017 form, not weakened or delayed as proposed by the administration.

Help make sure they get the message. Send your comment now.

Thank you!

Sincerely,

Dr. Mike Wilson
National Director for Occupational and Environmental Health

Mosquito control treatment scheduled for Tredyffrin and Easttown Townships to prevent West Nile Virus

Update: spraying did occur on July 24 but now more spraying is scheduled for July 30 in the same areas.

Release from Chesco Health Department, 7/20/18. [The map there shows 4 spray areas, including one park, 2 residential areas, and one cemetery. As we have asked in the past, how does one “prevent” a virus? Residents of the affected area, please see Don’t Spray Me! needs your help when spraying occurs.]

West Chester, PA – The Chester County Health Department will conduct a mosquito control treatment spray in portions of Tredyffrin and Easttown Townships (see maps below). The treatment is scheduled for Tuesday, July 24th from 8:00 pm to 11:30 pm. The rain date for this event is Wednesday, July 25th from 8:00 pm to 11:30 pm.

The Chester County Health Department conducts mosquito control treatment in areas with high levels of mosquito activity and where multiple mosquito samples have tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV). After exhausting all other available mosquito control strategies, spraying is conducted to reduce residents’ risk of WNV infection. Anyone living in an area where mosquitoes are infected with WNV is at risk, but the risk of infection is highest for people who work outside or participate in outdoor activities. Less than 1% of people infected will develop serious illness. While serious illness can occur in people of any age, people over 60 years of age, people who have received organ transplants, and people with certain medical conditions such as cancer, diabetes, hypertension, and kidney disease are at the greatest risk for serious illness.

The Chester County Health Department uses a truck-mounted sprayer to apply .66 ounces of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved product (DeltaGard) per acre of land. The mosquito control spray becomes inactive in just a few hours or with sunshine. Sprays are conducted after sunset, when mosquitoes are most active and bees have returned to their hives. Sprayers are turned off near bodies of water and apiaries to protect aquatic life and bees. The Chester County Health Department also notifies registered beekeepers and residents who are listed as hypersensitive in a designated spray area prior to conducting a spray. People who are concerned about exposure to mosquito control products can reduce their potential for exposure by staying indoors with children and pets when their neighborhood is being sprayed….

read more at Chesco Health Department

A serious case

If you have anything like this on your property, it’s time for immediate action! This photo shows about 100 mosquito larvae. The corresponding video shows them happily snapping their way (that’s how they move) around the shallow water rich in organic organic matter, their ideal habitat.

The good news is that an application of several tablets of the non-toxic larvicide Bti in a surface area of about 100 square feet virtually wiped out the larvae within 2 days.

With a bit of practice, it becomes easy to detect larvae in standing water. Sunlight helps show them, or a good flashlight. They are easily visible, about 3/8″ long, and a slight disruption of the water encourages them to zip around looking for shelter.

Don’t Spray Me! needs your help when spraying occurs

Whenever the Chesco Health Department plans a spraying event, the public needs to observe to be sure that applicable procedures are scrupulously followed and that adverse effects are as limited as possible. In 2017, the Health Department agreed to give 48 hours notice before spraying (it was previously 24 hours). Even so, we find that most people in the spray area do not receive the information and that many municipalities do not take responsibility for relaying it to their citizens.

We encourage you to Sign up for the Health Department mailing list so you will get the maximum warning.

Anyone in a spray area, please try to observe (without exposing yourself directly to spray) and let us know:

• The releases say: “After exhausting all other available mosquito control strategies…” Do you know of other such strategies to date in your locality, such as working with the municipal government to educate residents, larviciding suspect bodies of standing water, or alerting property owners whose properties may be violating the Health Department’s regulation against allowing mosquitoes to breed in standing water?

• Were adequate warnings posted on affected streets well in advance so residents and visitors will know to stay out of the way of the spray and take protective measures, such as closing windows, turning off wall air conditioners, and bringing children inside?

• Did you observe people who were not aware of the recommended precautions (such as joggers entering the area during or right after spraying)?

• Was there a lead truck with a loud speaker in front of the spray truck warning people to stay indoors or leave the vicinity?

• Did the truck spray more than once in any street or on any area? Does it crisscross any area, thus delivering a double dose to some addresses?

• Was the spray shut off as the truck approaches a stream or body of water and if so, how many feet away?

• In the days after spraying, what difference do you notice in the number of mosquitoes and other insects such as honey bees and dragonflies?

• Did you notice any effect, either immediate or after a few days, on children, cats, frogs, birds, bees, fish, or bats? Please try to video or photograph any evidence.

• How long did it take for the adult mosquito population to get back to about what it was before?

DSM needs you to help protect people and the environment and to let public officials know what you think.

Please also note these precautionary measures:

Spraying always occurs in the evening because bees are less active then and, if they know what is good for them, return to their hives (for what happens when spray is not scheduled properly see here). Beekeepers who have hives in the spray area need to take protective measures.

During the spraying (and ideally till the next day) residents should shut windows and close off all ways that outside air can enter their house. Cats should be brought inside, as they are sensitive to the pesticide used. The next day any outdoor play equipment should be hosed or wiped off before children come in contact with it.

People who have a high level of chemical sensitivity may wish to plan an absence overnight or longer. To sign up for the Pesticide Hypersensitivity Registry (which gives you notification of not only County spraying but also commercial spraying in your vicinity), see here.

Mosquito control treatment scheduled for Uwchlan Township to prevent West Nile Virus

[n.b. rescheduled to July 26 due to weather]

Release from Chester County Health Department, 7/23/18 [The map there, copied below, shows a sizable residential area including 3 parks. As we have asked in the past, how does one “prevent” a virus? Residents of the affected area, please see Don’t Spray Me! needs your help when spraying occurs.]

West Chester, PA – The Chester County Health Department will conduct a mosquito control treatment spray in a portion of Uwchlan Township (see maps below). The treatment is scheduled for Wednesday, July 25th from 8:00 pm to 11:30 pm. The rain date for this event is Thursday, July 26th from 8:00 pm to 11:30 pm.

The Chester County Health Department conducts mosquito control treatment in areas with high levels of mosquito activity and where multiple mosquito samples have tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV). After exhausting all other available mosquito control strategies, spraying is conducted to reduce residents’ risk of WNV infection. Anyone living in an area where mosquitoes are infected with WNV is at risk, but the risk of infection is highest for people who work outside or participate in outdoor activities. Less than 1% of people infected will develop serious illness. While serious illness can occur in people of any age, people over 60 years of age, people who have received organ transplants, and people with certain medical conditions such as cancer, diabetes, hypertension, and kidney disease are at the greatest risk for serious illness….

read more at http://hosted-p0.vresp.com/434903/54e5dbdaa2/ARCHIVE